WE ARE ALL DIFFERENT AND WE CAN GET TOGETHER WITH ONE INTEREST the BOOK

Image of WE ARE ALL DIFFERENT AND WE CAN GET TOGETHER WITH ONE INTEREST the BOOK

$50.00

18x21cm, 204 page book.
Limited edition of 200

Showcasing first collection of on going Photographic based series "WE ARE ALL DIFFERENT AND WE CAN GET TOGETHER WITH ONE INTEREST".

Signed and Numbered by the artist.
Graphic Designed by Kelly Jewell

"WE ARE ALL DIFFERENT AND WE CAN GET TOGETHER WITH ONE INTEREST" is an ongoing series Hiroyasu Tsuri commenced in 2016. This book comprises his collection of photographs taken using 35mm film cameras. Utilising film photography and a scratching method on some of the photographs Hiroyasu documents his experiences and interactions with people and places around the world.
             Tsuri has a passion for film cameras. Not only do each of his cameras carry a personal connection and story but they capture a palpable authenticity and cut of time. For this project, Tsuri photographed his travels using two different cameras. The first, an Olympus pen EE 2 35mm half film camera which he has had for 6 years. Initially Tsuri borrowed it from his old friend Pete Keen, then ended up claiming it for a while. Finally seeing Tsuri’s attachment to the camera, Peter gifted it to him. Produced in Japan from 1968 to 1977, the Olympus pen EE 2 is a very compact half frame camera, with just a viewfinder, no meter and fully manual settings. It has a 28mm f/3.5 Zuiko lens. 1
              The second camera, an Olympus Trip 35, which Tsuri has been carrying around for last 4 years was a gift from his father-in-law, John Jewell. The Trip 35 is a 35mm compact camera, introduced in 1967 and discontinued in 1984. The Trip 35 is a point and shoot model with a 40mm f2.8 lens, solar-powered selenium light meter, and just two shutter speeds. 2
              Tsuri’s scratching process involves using a knife and metal pointed pen to scratch off people’s faces –usually scratching in a skull, yet sometimes an animal or word. The method allows for a deep exploration into the individual and their narrative. “The action of scratching into people’s faces is like a metaphor of the process of getting to knowing people and finding a common interest without any bias ideas based on their superficial appearance. Through the method I practice to not be bias to people. I am tying to see what’s under their skin.”
              Tsuri senses society has an overwhelming tendency to judge people on initial contact. “It’s almost too easy to focus and be carried away on our difference by our skin, eye colour, gender, age, nationality, language, customs, mannerisms, educational background, financial background, family background, religion and more.. therefore it's hard not to be bias about people we first meet them.” He identifies this it is particularly prominent in today’s age, where it seems the mass media and politicians are feeding us a preconceived ideal of ‘normality’ in order to achieve their unreasonable agenda. Simply put, their ideologies and personal dogmas dictate our realities.
              By including photographs and subjects from all over the globe, from Australia to Europe, Asia to America, Tsuri has allowed himself to unveil and breakdown a diverse range of people. Through his technique in removing the surface of appearance, beliefs, race, and identity, he unearths a commonality in us all; that we are all human. In a world of continual advancement, globalisation, discrimination, discord, and political unrest, through his scratching process Tsuri provides a means to breakdown biases and accept difference. As a result the world would experience a progressive interaction between one another,one with kindness and harmony. 

 
Text by Nadia De Pellegrin